Home General 14 Democrats Who Broke With Their Party

14 Democrats Who Broke With Their Party

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Image credit to Pixabay and Wikimedia.org. Image modified from original.

The latest coronavirus stimulus package— The House Democrats approved— will rack up $3 trillion, allocating $1trillion for local governments and states. The budget was announced to utilized for testing, unemployment benefits, rounds of direct cash payments for Americans, and medical paraphernalia.

The bill will be catering to provide a safety net for homeowners from foreclosures and evictions and to prolong medical and family leave previously passed by Congress. The legislation will also assist essential workers such as Amtrak workers, rail, aviation, and visas for immigrants. 

Democrats have branded the bill the HEROES Act, a nod to the people working on the front lines against the pandemic.

The 208-199 vote was mostly along party lines, though a number of lawmakers broke with their parties, encompassing 14 Democrats and one Republican, Rep. Peter King (N.Y.). He outlined his position earlier this week.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi stated that when she announced the legislation on Wednesday, the bill was “necessary to address the corona crisis,” indicating the bill will prioritize “opening our economy safely and soon, honoring our heroes, and then putting much-needed money in the pockets of Americans.”

The House votes arrived as the unemployment rate increases to degrees unfathomed since the Great Depression, with countless of Americans unemployed.

Several Democrats who voted against the bill are centrists or GOP targets who might be susceptible ahead of the November election. However, 1 progressive, Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), also voted against the bill.

Almost 24 lawmakers from both parties were absent from the vote.

Here are the Democrats who broke with their party on the bill.

Cindy Axne (Iowa)

Axne stated that she couldn’t vote for the bill “in good conscience,” branding the law “Washington gamesmanship.”

Joe Cunningham (S.C.)

In his first term, Cunningham indicated his dissatisfaction with the HEROES Act, describing it as “Washington politics at its worst.”

Sharice Davids (Kan.)

“The partisan nature and wide scope of this bill make it doomed upon arrival in the Senate — only further delaying the aid that Kansans desperately need,” Davids stated. 

Abby Finkenauer (Iowa)

“The next federal COVID-19 relief package must be focused on helping families, workers, small businesses, and local governments,” she stated. 

Susan Wild (Pa.)

“Now is the time to bring our nation together around solutions that will improve the lives of Americans who are hurting, not engage in partisan gamesmanship,” Wild said in a statement.

Xochitl Torres Small (N.M.) 

Torres Small, 35, is in her first term serving New Mexico’s 2nd District. She beat Republican challenger Yvette Herrell by fewer than 4,000 votes in 2018.

Abigail Spanberger (Va.)

Spanberger claimed that several members of her party exploited the package as an opportunity to make “political statements.” 

Kurt Schrader (Ore.)

Schrader, who’s been in Congress since 2009, has amassed one of the more conservative voting portfolios among Democrats, voting against a House resolution condemning President Trump’s military actions against Iran.

Ben McAdams (Utah)

McAdams called the bill a partisan “wish-list,” stating that too many provisions in the HEROES Act strayed from the actual target of supporting the country.

Elaine Luria (Va.)

Luria noted that the HEROES Act would double the federal costs for the fiscal year and claimed spending of that scale needed input from both parties.

Conor Lamb (Pa.)

Lamb, 35, claimed that lawmakers must work harder to discover “common ground” when organizing legislation to aid Americans amid the crisis.

Pramila Jayapal (Wash.)

Jayapal, co-chairwoman of the Progressive Congressional Caucus (PCC), released a statement prior to the vote on Friday, claiming that she won’t be voting for the HEROES Act.

Jared Golden (Maine)

Golden branded the decision to vote against the HEROES Act “difficult,” claiming that he agreed to many parts of the bill.

Kendra Horn (Okla.)

Horn claimed that bills that lack bipartisanship amid crises such as the pandemic are a “disservice to the American people.”

6 COMMENTS

  1. AMERICANS WE HAVE TO TAKE BACK OUR AMERICA FROM THE EVIL CRIMINAL ACTS OF DEMOCRATS………………………..TO SOLVE AMERICAS PROBLEMS MAKE THIS CHOICE WE THE PEOPLE’ HAVE THE POWER OF OUR VOICES AND OUR VOTES, TO VOTE OUT THE ENTIRE LYING,CORRUPT, TREASONOUS DEMOCRAT PARTY COME NOV 2020, VOTE TO MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN AND TO END ALL CORRUPTIONS IN WASHINGTON GOVERNMENT
    “Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!” (Isaiah 5:20).

  2. The biggest thing we need right now is to establish term limits. Who gets elected into the White House has little bearing when we have the same corruption that has been there for a very long time. Congress was not not meant to be a career position. That’s not the way it was founded. Congress is supposed to be made up of ordinary citizens who are to speak for those they represent. Not the interests of a political party. When it was conceived there was no pay involved. No retirement packages etc. They took the positions because they wanted to represent their people. They were paid for travel as an ordinary citizen with meals and lodging while in session. Our founding fathers are rolling over in their graves at the 200 ring circus congress has become. Nearly everything is down party lines instead of what’s right and what’s wrong. Salaries need to be removed as should retirement packages. They all vote these things in for themselves. If we took away the money aspect and put in term limits then we might have a chance of getting people in that are genuinely interested in representing the people. We have lost “By the people and for the people”. It’s now by the party and for the party. They want to cry about the top 1% not paying their fair share when in fact that top 1% pays half of all tax revenues and the other half is an overburdened middle class while nearly half of the country pays no taxes. No wonder we’re past broke and going deeper in the red with every second that passes. I despise hearing the term “They spend money like a drunken sailor”. I once was a drunken sailor and even in my most inebriated state knew to stop spending money once I was broke.

    • Very well said “Little Johnny”!!! Every word you wrote is true and some things said are quite amusing!!! I love it! Thanks for much for sharing your wonderful thoughts and beliefs!
      Therese Scribner

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